Posts Tagged With: Miriam

Miriam, Looking For a Well

In memory of Landra Kerekes June 13th, 1972 – October 9th, 2022

This post contains a lot of photographs, so my writing might appear oddly broken up by them on mobile devices.

This year, I had the pleasure of being in the Land of Israel during Sukkot (2022). But for the first time, my heart was torn about going. This was especially surprising since Covid had prevented me from traveling since my last trip in 2019. I felt a great deal of guilt about my heart not being completely elated at the great blessing and opportunity of taking my feet to Jerusalem during the feast.

There were two reasons for my apprehension. The first was due to the fact that I would have to miss my son’s turning blue ceremony in the Army. Though I was able to briefly see him in July when he turned green, I do not know when I will be able to see him again. It was difficult on my momma’s heart to miss this occasion. The second is the reason for this post. One of my dearest friends was in her last weeks of life, and after seeing her during the Days of Awe the Shabbat morning before Yom Kippur, I knew she would likely pass while I was away and I would miss any opportunities to see her in this life again.

But I had made a commitment in service to Adonai and His people. Mercifully, I was able to speak with my son before my flight took off, and I rested knowing that my husband, other son, and my mother in love were there to support him. Our first full day in the Holy Land was on Shabbat. We were in Jerusalem and spent the day in the Old City. I brought all of my anguish to Adonai at the Kotel. As usual, I imagined the Holy One looking through the lattice of the Wall at the many gathered there to worship Him to be as close as possible to where the Temple once stood. I knew somehow, He would soothe my heart and give me grace to find the joy I should have at the feast.

“My beloved is like a gazelle or a young stag. Behold, he is standing behind our wall, He is looking through the windows, He is peering through the lattice. My beloved responded and said to me, ‘Arise, my darling, my beautiful one, and come along.” (Song of Solomon 2:9-10, NASB)

That night, our group arrived at Biblical Tamar Park (Ir Ovot), our home base for tours, located in the Aravah desert in the region of the Wilderness of Zin, also not far from the Dead Sea. Tamar is an archeology site in Ir Ovot with seven periods of history being represented there. It is one of the forty-two stations the Israelite’s camped at during their wilderness wanderings. (Num. 21:10-11) It was in this fascinating place that we entered into the first day of Sukkot. Tamar has a huge year round sukkah, one of my favorite features of the park.

Views from Tamar

On the first Yom Tov of the feast, we didn’t have touring on the agenda, only celebrating the first festival Shabbat of Sukkot. After breakfast, I received word that my dear friend, Landra Kerekes, had crossed over from this life to the next. If you knew her, she would have whooped and shouted in praise that she was given such an awesome Yahrzeit.[1] And if anyone ever deserved such a great honor, it would have been her. She was completely sold out to our King, and would willingly go and do whatever He asked of her with great joy. I could tell you many stories about how Adonai used this woman, and after hearing them, you would be inspired to go and do the same. Her love knew no bounds, and to know her was to know the Messiah she served. Our women’s group was profoundly affected and changed forever by her example, and she will be missed greatly.

The Sukkah at Tamar

So on the day when I should have been joyous, I was heartbroken. I tried to set my tears aside, but they freely flowed every time her memory came to my thoughts. I was thankful that I was able to retreat to my room when the grief was especially heavy. Dr. Alewine graciously said Kaddish for her while we were in the sukkah that morning. That afternoon, she taught a lesson in the airconditioned dining hall. I sat in the very back, knowing my focus was lacking. One of the things we teach our tour groups is the Song of the Aravah from Isaiah 35:1-2, of which the curator of Biblical Tamar Park gets its name: Blossoming Rose.

“The wilderness and the solitary place shall be glad for them; and the desert shall rejoice, and blossom as the rose. It shall blossom abundantly, and rejoice even with joy and singing: the glory of Lebanon shall be given unto it, the excellency of Carmel and Sharon, they shall see the glory of the LORD, and the excellency of our God.” (Isaiah 35:1-2, KJV)

We had just finished practicing the song, and Dr. Alewine was wrapping up her message, when one of the tourists tapped me on the shoulder. She said, “There is a woman here looking for the family with five children.” I got up and went outside to meet her and take her to the park manager. I knew of the family she spoke of, but they had traveled to Jerusalem before we arrived. I offered to walk her to the office to find the park manager. Along the way, the woman asked me what we were doing in the dining hall. No doubt she had heard us singing. I told her we were a tour group from the US and Canada celebrating the feast of Sukkot, and that our teacher had just given a lesson.

She asked me if we believed in Yeshua. I said, “Yes!” She said, “Me too. And, I am also here for the feast.” Her accent was heavy, and I couldn’t quite place it at first. She said, “But, we do not have a sukkah.” I exclaimed, “We have a sukkah, come and see. You are welcome to join us in our sukkah.” She entered the grand sukkah and commented on how lovely it was. We continued toward where I thought the manager would be, but she wasn’t there. The Park is large, and the manager could have been anywhere on property where she was needed.

Well Replica at Tamar

I offered to walk the woman to the other side of the archeology site, where we might find the manager. But, my eyes were swollen and tired from tears, so I asked her if she minded if I returned to the dining hall to get my sunglasses. She obliged, and I offered to fill her water bottle. Afterwards, we headed back outside. As we walked, the woman asked me if the well on property was dry. I told her that I didn’t believe it was. Then, she asked me my name. In turn, I asked for hers. I had trouble with the pronunciation. She said, “It’s a French version of Mary. Just call me Miriam.”

Ancient Well at Tamar

Miriam again asked me about the wells on property. “Are they dry?” she asked. I wasn’t sure if she was referring to the ancient well at Tamar – historically, it was an oasis along the old spice route in the desert – or something more modern. I asked for clarification, and she indeed meant the ancient well. Again, she asked, “Is the well dry?” I had never seen water come from the well, but knew that water still flowed underneath the Park. I told her so.

Landra Kerekes Teaching on Tu B’Shevat 2020

She then tells me that she arrived at the Park by hitchhiking. I looked her up and down. She didn’t look like a hitchhiker. She was well dressed, with sunflowers on her shirt/vest. She saw my look of surprise and laughed. Then, she began to tell me several stories about her adventures of witnessing of Yeshua. Hitchhiking was one of her favorite ways to do so. She had just been with a twenty year old Jewish man that works at the salt plant on the Dead Sea. She said, “He was so hungry for the Lord that he didn’t want me to get out of the car.” I thought, how brave and bold this woman is! And then, tears began to stream down my face from behind my sunglasses. I was profoundly struck by the notion that she was an odd Swedish/German Hebrew speaking version of my dear friend, Landra! She didn’t look or sound like Landra, but her living faith and actions were definitely like her.

I apologized for my tears and explained their cause. She reached up and wiped the tears from my face with her hand. She told me they were beautiful and that my friend was now with God having the best Sukkot ever. (This only made me want to cry more.) After realizing that we could not find the Park manager, I asked her if we could give her a ride somewhere. She pointed toward Scorpion’s Ascent and Miriam’s Spring (the area where Miriam died in the wilderness) and said that God would provide her a car.

I knew the area she pointed toward was hardly traveled and that the sun would be setting soon. I asked her again, and she laughed at me. “Don’t you

Ancient Ruins of Tamar

know that God provides everything we need in the desert? But first, I will go up on the Tel and see if I can find the well,” she said. (This is also something my friend Landra would remind me of.)

“Miriam, it was a pleasure meeting you. You have brought some comfort to my grieving heart today,” I replied. “Are you sure we can’t give you a ride?”

She said, “No thank you. Have a blessed Sukkot, Kisha.”

With that, she turned and began ascending the Tel at Tamar (Ir Ovot), and I began walking back to the dining hall. As soon as she was out of my presence, the oddity of the whole encounter hit me like a ton of bricks. Who was that woman? Miriam looking for a well? Really? I was awestruck by the thought that I had just entertained an angel unaware. When she was with me, nothing seemed unusual, but the minute I walked away, my mind began to race. I looked back, but I didn’t see her.

Whether she was a heavenly or earthly messenger, I know not. What I do know is that she was meant to bring me comfort in the midst of grief, and the fortitude to push forward for the sake of our tourists and the holy festival. Later, I asked if anyone had seen the woman come down from the Tel or leave the Park. Not one of the forty had seen her leave, even though the class had finished and many were outside. Also, the Park manager was suddenly exactly where I thought she would be. Miriam, who had reminded me of my friend Landra, and who had asked me three times if the well was dry, was gone.

As I pondered the encounter, many things became obvious (after the fact). Landra had a women’s ministry called “Mayim,” waters. When Biblical Miriam died, the congregation lacked for water. (Num 20:1-2) But in Landra’s case, the ancient wells of the Torah that she re-dug are still freely flowing with mayim chayim, living waters. If I could see Miriam again, I would tell her that the well is definitely NOT dry!

Song of the Well

Numbers 21:10-20 (CJB) The people of Isra’el traveled on and camped at Ovot. 11 From Ovot they traveled and camped at `Iyei-Ha`avarim, in the desert fronting Mo’av on the east. 12 From there they traveled and camped in Vadi Zered. 13 From there they traveled and camped on the other side of the Arnon, in the desert; this river comes out of the territory of the Emori; for the Arnon is the boundary between Mo’av and the Emori. 14 This is why it says, in the Book of the Wars of Adonai, “. . . Vahev at Sufah, the vadis of Arnon, 15 and the slope of the vadis extending as far as the site of `Ar, which lie next to the territory of Mo’av.” 16 From there they went on to Be’er [well]; that is the well about which Adonai said to Moshe, “Assemble the people, and I will give them water.” 17 Then Isra’el sang this song: “Spring up, oh well! Sing to the well 18 sunk by the princes, dug by the people’s leaders with the scepter, with their staffs!” From the desert they went to Mattanah, 19 from Mattanah to Nachali’el, from Nachali’el to Bamot, 20 and from Bamot to the valley by the plain of Mo’av at the start of the Pisgah range, where it overlooks the desert.

I expect Miriam already knows the well she asked about isn’t dry. Toward the end of Sukkot, I asked our bus driver to drive us down the road so the tourists could see Scorpion’s Ascent (Ma’ Ale Akrabim) and nearby Miriam’s Spring. He said, “You can’t go that way. The road is closed. Didn’t you see the signs?” No. Apparently, I had missed them every single time we came in and out of Tamar Park.

I was flabbergasted. The way “Miriam” was headed is currently impassable by car or bus due to flooding tearing up the road. Where did Miriam go? She was dropped off right where the signs say the road is closed. Not coincidentally, each night of Sukkot, I gave a mini teaching on the seven Ushpizin or guests of the sukkah. (I will post about this before Sukkot next year on Grace in Torah.) Sometimes the Ushpizin are called the Seven Shepherds. (Micah 5:4-5) Essentially, these guests or shepherds represent seven particular attributes of God.[2] There is a patriarch and matriarch associated with each trait and they are said to inspect one’s sukkah (heart) as we graciously invite them in to do so. Obviously, this an object lesson. They are parables of the unseen Holy Spirit of God doing this work in our hearts.

Just a couple hours after Miriam left the Park, the second night of Sukkot began. The shepherds for night two are Isaac and Miriam, both associated with water and wells. Without realizing it, I had invited “Miriam” into our sukkah and I gave her water to drink. She was a guest of the Park, and we gave her hospitality. As I sat that evening and pondered these things, I was in awe of the Holy One.

At last, my heart was settled. I felt like I had been given grace to suspend my grief for a little while. But, the minute I got on the plane to return home, the tears returned. I am so grateful for the many lovely women in my midst that have allowed me to cry on their figurative shoulders since returning home. Many of us first met Landra because a friend invited her to one of our new moon gatherings. We plan to remember Landra as we celebrate the eighth month tomorrow evening. Looking back through photos, I just realized today that I knew her for a glorious seven years, a full Shemittah cycle. What a gift, Abba!

Original Artwork by Landra Kerekes
Notice the Water Imagery

I am still in awe that before the close of the first day of Sukkot, the King of the Universe sent me a comforter, a guest to entertain, and a reminder that the wells that Landra dug will continue to flow with living waters. She might be gone, but her wells are NOT dry. She lived like a Renewed man, like resurrected flesh, because she really had died to the old Landra. I can’t tell you how much I learned from this woman, not just her words (which were never lashon hara), but most especially through her actions. Her ministry lives on because Yeshua lives. Landra was a blossom in the desert, a rose, or perhaps a sunflower like Miriam wore. God chose to pick that beautiful bloom, but we still have her blessed memory and legacy until we meet again in the Olam Haba. As I recounted this story to our Shabbat fellowship this weekend, someone pointed out how sunflowers always have their faces pointed toward the sun. Hallelujah! That was my sister, my friend. Her face never ceased from focusing on The Son. Thank you, Miriam, for wearing this beautiful bloom.

I found mayim in the desert this year, a well that I can sing to. May it spring up in all of us. “Spring up, oh well! Sing to the well sunk by the princes, dug by the people’s leaders with the scepter, with their staffs!” (Num 21:17) Thank you for being the best earthly counselor, Landra (a.k.a. Etsah). I will strive to lead the flock to the wells of salvation in the same spirit of love and honor you showed each little ewe. Blessed are You, O Adonai our God, dayan ha’emet – the True Judge.

The following video was recorded by Landra in May of 2020. The Tempest series of videos involve insights she gleaned while dealing with her diagnosis. This is one of my favorites. As I rewatched it for this post, I couldn’t help but to be dumbfounded by our experience on the first night in the sukkah this year at Tamar. The wind was up, and we were literally being sandblasted by the dust and sand blowing around. The whole group was made of those who persevere – and we stayed in the sukkah and fellowshipped despite this great irritant to our flesh. I have NO doubt that Landra would have cheered us on, exclaiming, “Take it all, Lord!” (Referring to Him stripping away our flesh.) Your memory is a blessing, dear sister!

 


[1] Yahrzeit is the anniversary of one’s death.

[2] Many of the seven are found in the following blessing of David: 1 Chronicles 29:10-13 (TLV) David blessed Adonai before the whole congregation saying, “Blessed are You, Adonai, God of Israel our father, from eternity to eternity! 11 Yours, Adonai, is the greatness, the power (Gevurah) and the splendor (Tiferet), and the (Hod) and the majesty, indeed everything in heaven and earth. Yours is the kingdom (Malchut), Adonai and You are exalted above all. 12 Both riches and honor come from You. You rule over everything. In Your hand is power and might, in Your hand, to magnify and give strength to all. 13 Now, our God, we give you thanks and praise Your glorious Name.”

The other traits are Chesed (Lovingkindness), Netzach (eternity/victory), Yesod (Foundation). For each trait, there is a patriarch and matriarch that lived out that trait in some manner for us to learn from by example. Look for a post in the fall of 2023 for a complete explanation.

Categories: Biblical Symbols, Moedim, Mussar, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , | 13 Comments

Miriam’s Cup Part II

In Miriam’s Cup Part I, we looked at the rather new custom of drinking WATER from a goblet inscribed with Miriam’s name during the Passover Seder. We explored where this tradition originated and why it may be important to incorporate into your own Seder. We also discovered the strong connection of Miriam with water. In this post, we will look at how the Holy Spirit is also linked to the imagery of water, wisdom, Pesach, and women.

© Lakis Fourouklas

© Lakis Fourouklas

The Three Leaders of Israel and the Godhead

“Indeed, I brought you up from the land of Egypt And ransomed you from the house of slavery, And I sent before you Moses, Aaron and Miriam. (Micah 6:4)

The rabbis teach us that there are three good gifts that were extended to the children of Israel– the well, the clouds, and the manna.  The well was provided due to the merit of Miriam, the clouds of glory because of Aaron, and the manna on account of Moses.[1]

The link between the clouds of glory and Aaron is understandable when considering his specific role. Aaron officiated as High Priest in the Mishkan (Tabernacle) that was perpetually covered with the protective pillar of cloud that shielded it by day.  He also ministered daily at the burning altar, just as the parallel pillar of fire hovered over the Mishkan at night.[2] Moses’ association with the heavenly manna is equally fathomable. He was the lawgiver and became synonymous with the Torah or Word of God. Bread (manna) has long been a symbol for the Torah and the Word.

What might not be immediately apparent is why the rabbis attribute the well or rock that gushed forth water in the wilderness with Miriam. In the Brit Chadashah (N.T.), we learn that the rock that followed them was in fact, Messiah.

For I do not want you to be unaware, brethren, that our fathers were all under the cloud and all passed through the sea; and all were baptized into Moses in the cloud and in the sea; and all ate the same spiritual food; and all drank the same spiritual drink, for they were drinking from a spiritual rock which followed them; and the rock was Christ. (1Cor. 10:1-4)

Is there a contradiction between what Paul teaches in 1 Corinthians and what the rabbi’s say about this “rock” or “well”? I hope to show you the harmony in their teachings with all three leaders (Moses, Aaron, and Miriam) and the glorious gifts (clouds, manna, and the well). In Part I, we started building the foundation as to why Miriam is linked to water. I hope to continue with this premise here. In the Book of Numbers, the water from the rock dries up immediately following Miriam’s death.

Then the sons of Israel, the whole congregation, came to the wilderness of Zin in the first month; and the people stayed at Kadesh. Now Miriam died there and was buried there. And there was no water for the congregation, and they assembled themselves against Moses and Aaron. (Num. 20:1-2)

The Torah seems to beg one to ask the question as to why the congregation had no water immediately following the death of Miriam. In Hebrew, these thoughts run together with a rhythmic flow. Indeed, the people viewed her as a source of life giving waters. Hopefully, you too can make this connection after reading Part I.

Moses, Aaron, and Miriam represented the King of the Universe on the earth. Is it not fitting that there were 3 of them? Isn’t the godhead most often manifested in 3 (Father, Son, Holy Spirit)? Perhaps what may be eating at you is that Elohim would choose a female to represent one of His roles. Moses is clearly the strong father figure to Israel (as Law giver), Aaron is clearly a mediator and priest (like the Son, Yeshua), so Miriam and the life giving waters must represent the Holy Spirit. If you’ve read the Role of Women, this idea isn’t as threatening as it may first appear.

Hebrew students are fully aware that the Spirit of Elohim is always in the feminine form. (This is true of all spirits.) Thus, its not surprising to find God’s Spirit paired with feminine attributes or given to feminine metaphors quite frequently in the Bible. YHWH is neither male nor female, yet He has qualities that we would associate with each sex. This is why it takes BOTH a male and a female to display the image of Elohim in the natural.

The Ruach Hakodesh in Heaven and Earth

To better understand how Miriam, water, and the Holy Spirit can be equivalent expressions, review the first occurrence of Elohim’s Spirit is in Genesis.

The earth was formless and void, and darkness was over the surface of the deep, and the Spirit of God was moving over the surface of the waters. (Gen. 1:2)

What is the Spirit of Elohim doing in the beginning? It is hovering or moving over the WATERS. Thus, our first association of the Ruach Hakodesh is with water. The primordial waters are separated into earthly waters (mayim) and heavenly waters (shamayim). Did you notice how waters and heavens sound alike in Hebrew? Can you see mayim in the shamayim?

Interestingly, the word for heavens, shamayim, denotes “fire waters” as it is a compound of the word water (mayim) and fire (esh).[4] We will explore this idea some more in a moment. But first,  look at the word for Spirit in Hebrew: ruach. Most of you already know that ruach is also the word for wind or breath. What might not be immediately obvious is that the air and wind are the heavenly counterparts to the earthly water currents. Wind powers most ocean and air currents. In Hebraic thought these “currents” of the mayim and shamayim reflect one another. Or you could say that “it is on earth as it is in heaven”.

Consider how the birds and fish move, migrate, school, or flock as they follow these currents across the globe — carrying seed. If you find these connections fascinating, I urge you to study Dr. Hollisa Alewine’s Creation Gospel.[5] You’ll never look at creation week or the whole of scripture again without noticing these often repeated themes. Waters and heavens are mirrors of one another; therefore, the notion that the Holy Spirit is both like wind and water is natural in Hebraic thought.

In the Gen. 1:2 verse above, God’s Spirit is moving, hovering, or brooding over the waters. Indeed, the Spirit of YHWH is active like the wind/birds and the water/fish. The Hebrew verb used is rachaph; the AHLB[6] defines it as the following:

Strongs #7363: AHLB#: 2763 (V) Flutter: The stirrings and shakings of a bird in the nest – Flutter: [freq. 3] (vf: Paal, Piel) |KJV: shake, move, flutter| {str: 7363}

Did you notice the tangible picture of a mother bird fluttering, shaking, and stirring her nest? Does this bring other verses to mind about Elohim being a protective mother bird?

“Like an eagle that stirs up its nest, That hovers over its young, He spread His wings and caught them, He carried them on His pinions. (Dt. 32:11)

Like flying birds so the LORD of hosts will protect Jerusalem. He will protect and deliver it; He will pass over and rescue it. (Is. 31:5)

“Jerusalem, Jerusalem, who kills the prophets and stones those who are sent to her! How often I wanted to gather your children together, the way a hen gathers her chicks under her wings, and you were unwilling. (Mt. 23:37)

These movements are mimicked in the word for Passover, Pesach. It is a derivative of the protective fluttering actions of a mother bird.[7] [8] Indeed, our Great Elohim moves, flutters, leaps, and hovers over His Creation and His people like a mother protecting her precious chicks. This nurturing aspect of YHWH is divinely displayed in the female creatures of His creation. The Exodus story and the original Passover speak to our initial redemption, which is the Father calling us out for Himself. The “immature” state of the people (and us!) at this initial point of salvation necessitates the tenderness that can only be offered by a mother. Thus, we see YHWH’s Spirit pesach(ing) over the homes of His newborn chicks in Israel.

Pesach and Baptism

By carefully examining what happened when the “death angel” came through Egypt, we see that the same Spirit of YHWH that protected the Israelites also killed the first born of Egypt.

‘The blood shall be a sign for you on the houses where you live; and when I see the blood I will pass over you, and no plague will befall you to destroy you when I strike the land of Egypt. (Ex. 12:13)

Now it came about at midnight that the LORD struck all the firstborn in the land of Egypt, from the firstborn of Pharaoh who sat on his throne to the firstborn of the captive who was in the dungeon, and all the firstborn of cattle. (Ex. 12:29)

The Ruach HaKodesh can nurture and protect and at the same time bring destruction on His enemies. The Spirit is truly like the “waters” that we discussed in Part I. The difference is that the Holy Spirit is always acting with righteousness, even in judgment. After the Children of Israel are released from the grip of Pharaoh, they flee to the wilderness. Without a constant and considerable food and water source, the fledgling nation would be sure to die.

What happens is follows:

  • After 3 days without water, they reach Marah. The waters are bitter (undrinkable). Moses casts a branch in the waters and they are “sweetened”. (Ex. 15) This was YHWH testing the people.
  • They then find an oasis at Elim where 12 streams water the 12 tribes. (Ex. 15)
  • The people begin to cry out for food. YHWH provides them with the heavenly manna. (Ex. 16)
  • They reach Rephidim and again cry out for water. YHWH instructs Moses to strike the rock at Mt. Horeb and water gushes out for the people. (Ex. 17)

A person can live far longer without food than water. The beginning of Israel’s wilderness journey seems to center around issues of water. Miracles and judgments happen with water. Rejoicing and praise are performed by the edge of water. Bitter water is sweetened as a test. The twelve tribes each find their own refreshing stream at Elim. A miraculous “rock” becomes a well that can sustain millions. That same rock FOLLOWS them!

Water, water everywhere! Though the children can’t see it in the natural, they are surrounded with life giving water. (Does this remind you of the Rivers of Eden?) Is this not just like the Holy Spirit? We can’t see the “Spirit”, yet it is everywhere. One connection to the Spirit and water that is tangible to most all Believers is Baptism (or immersing in a Mikveh).

Baptism is a natural picture of the work of the Holy Spirit in the very beginning. The movement and separation of the mayim (water) and shamayim (fire waters) is the same moving and separating that happens when we experience this ritual.[9] It may be an outward symbol of an inward work, but to assume the Holy Spirit isn’t directly involved (and often in a very visible way) is not true. The washing and filling is pictured by both the water and the holy fire! Sometimes these are simultaneous experiences, and sometimes they are separate. Nevertheless, they reflect one another like the waters and the heavens and like the pillar of cloud and the pillar of fire. Unlike some, I fully believe this process is in continual motion and cyclical even in our individual lives.

But this still leaves us with our original question. Why are Messiah and Miriam both equated to the rock or well of water in the wilderness? Speaking of Messiah, Paul also has this to say:

  For in him dwelleth all the fulness of the Godhead bodily. (Col. 2:9 KJV)

Elohim is One (Shema Dt. 6:4). When Yeshua walked the earth, He was the tangible form of the fullness of YHWH. Thus, we see Him in numerous places attributing an action to Himself and then declaring that the same action is really from the Holy Spirit or the Father.

Yeshua will not leave us comfortless, He will come to us, yet the comforter is the Holy Spirit.[10] Yeshua gives us Living Waters, but then proclaims that these waters are the Holy Spirit.[11] Just as Moses and even Aaron were prefigures of the Messiah, so is Miriam. The analogies are similar to both Moses and Yeshua being the Law giver. Or both Aaron and Yeshua being the High Priest. Why would it be any different for both Miriam and Yeshua to be the well in the rock?  Therefore, who is right? The rabbis or Paul? The answer is both!

Stay tuned for one last post in this series. My hope is to conclude by filling Miriam’s Cup with the Living Waters and the Mashiach in Part III.


[1] Talmud Bavli (Babylonian Talmud), Tractate Ta’anit 9a:  R. Jose the son of R. Judah says: Three good leaders had arisen for Israel … Moshe, Aaron and Miriam, and for their sake three good things were conferred [upon Israel], namely, the Well, the Pillar of Cloud and the Manna; the Well, for the merit of Miriam; the Pillar of Cloud for the merit of Aaron; the Manna for the merit of Moshe.

[2] Exodus 40:38

[3] See my post The Biblical Role of Women Part V for more on the feminine aspects of the Holy Spirit.

[4] The roots of the word shamayim are אש (esh, fire) and מים (mayim, water) The beginning letter א (aleph) is a silent stand-in for a beginning consonant, nothing more. Dropping it does not change the meaning of the two-letter word. So the Hebrew שמים literally means fire in water. The great Jewish commentator Rashi  says this about Genesis 1:8: The word shamayim is a contraction of [a word for] carrying of water, also [a word meaning] there is water, also esh and mayim, [meaning] fire and water. He blended them with one another and made the heavens from them. For more imagery of fire, see The Biblical Role of Women Part XI.

[5] Thecreationgospel.com

[6] Ancient Hebrew Lexicon of the Bible by Jeff Benner

[7] They share the two letter parent root chet, pey; which means to cover (in protective action).

[8] See my post on the Meaning of Passover.

[9] John answered and said to them all, “As for me, I baptize you with water; but One is coming who is mightier than I, and I am not fit to untie the thong of His sandals; He will baptize you with the Holy Spirit and fire. (Luke 3:16)

[10] John 14

[11] John 7:38-39

Categories: Moedim, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 7 Comments

Miriam’s Cup Part I

miriams cup 3

This Passover season, I have given an often overlooked custom a second glance — well more like a long hard stare! Many of you incorporate the mystical and prophetic Cup of Elijah in your Passover Seders. For Believers in Messiah, this cup takes on even more significance because of John the Baptist. He truly paved the Way for Messiah at His first coming. Since we have already seen this “cyclical” prophecy fulfilled once, hopefully we will better be able to discern the spirit of Elijah in these last days.

If you’ve purchased a special goblet with Elijah’s name written on it to use at your Passover Seder, you may have noticed another more obscure goblet inscribed with Miriam’s name. What is this cup for? Is it just to satiate liberals and feminists? Does this “new” ritual have any redeeming value? My hope is to show you the richness and beauty that this tradition can bring to your Passover table, and perhaps even to your weekly Kiddush.

The Cup of Miriam is not part of a traditional Seder, and I can find no mention of it in any of the feast books that I own. (But, don’t let that deter you from reading on!) According to Risa Borsykowsky[1] , the practice of drinking WATER from a special kiddush cup called Kos Miriam, began with Stephanie Loo Ritari and her Rosh Chodesh Boston group in the late 1980s. Reading through the Exodus, one can find numerous righteous women that played significant roles that led up to the redemption of Israel from Egypt.[2] Mrs. Ritari decided to bring these “hidden” women into the “retelling” of the Passover story to not only honor the matriarchs, but as a tool to make the Seder more comprehensive for women and girls. The most prominent woman of the Exodus story is Moses’ sister, Miriam. Therefore, she will be our focus in this study.

The Bible calls Miriam a prophetess of Israel.[3] She alone ensured that baby Moses would live by following him as he floated down the treacherous Nile River.[4] She watched as Pharaoh’s daughter drew Moses from the water, and then cunningly secured Moses’ own mother as his wet-nurse. She helped sustain the Israelites during their trek across the wilderness and she led them in joyous song and dance to praise YHWH for the miracle of parting the Red Sea. Upon her death, the Israelites grumbled against Moses and Aaron for a lack of life giving water.[5]

Did you notice the many connections of Miriam with water?[6]

Though her name can mean bitterness or even rebellion, the Hebrew also reveals that there is another (positive) side to Miriam. This should give hope to us all, as we each have both a good and evil inclination that wars for supremacy. To learn the duality of Miriam is to understand the ancient contradiction of what it is to be human. We all share the life long struggle between spirit and flesh.

Moreover, we would be wise to consider that other than one bad instance, Miriam’s portrayal of rebellion and bitterness was toward the anti-torah decrees of Pharaoh.[7] She and her family risked their lives by rebelling against Pharaoh. The midwives Puah and Shifrah acted similarly by defying Pharaoh’s edict to kill Hebrew male babies. It is interesting that it was the fearlessness of WOMEN that initially ignited the courage of all Israel. These brave lionesses stood firm and earned a spot forever in the Torah of our Elohim. Why would we leave their stories out of our maggid (retelling of the Passover story)?  Would our daughters not be strengthened to hear year after year that they too have this great potential residing within them?

Miriam and Water

As I was studying the many links between Miriam, water, wells, fountains, the Holy Spirit, the Word, Yeshua, and Living Waters, I could hardly contain my excitement! Miriam is spelled mem, resh, yod, mem. Water is spelled mem, yod, mem.

Did you notice how similar these words are in Hebrew? Miriam is water with an added resh, which is pictographically a head. Thus, her name is literally head or lead waters. This meaning can also be demonstrated another way in Hebrew by looking at Miriam as a compound of two words: mar and yam. These words mean bitter/strong and sea (waters) respectively. Hence again, Miriam is associated with the idea of strong (head) waters.

But what do strong waters imply and what are we to learn from this association? In order to get the full impact of Miriam’s role and name, we must first understand WATER from a Hebraic perspective. Mayim (mem, yod, mem) is a word bookended with two mem(s). The Hebrew letter mem is likened to water, a womb (it’s full of water), strength (as in gushing waters), chaos (again like an ocean), and as a preposition “to come forth from or out of”. This letter is one of a handful that has a sofit or final form when it is written at the end of a Hebrew word. A regular mem is open on the bottom, whereas the final form is closed.

mem

Rabbi Michael L. Munk, in his book The Wisdom of the Hebrew Alphabet on the letter mem, states, “The word mayim, water, with its initial and end mem, one open and one closed, depicts the accessible and the inaccessible – an allusion to the waters at Creation.” Thus, mem also illustrates what is revealed and what is concealed. Add to that the letter at the heart of mayim, yod (a hand, work, or deed), and the Creation waters (and all water thereafter) become the same contradiction that we see in Miriam’s name: a work or deed that has the potential for life (strong living waters) or death (bitterness and rebellion).

Water is a place of darkness and yet, great potential in Creation and in a woman’s womb. It can be as powerful and destructive as a roaring ocean and as gentle and satisfying as a trickling stream. It is at the same time both a life giving necessity and a place where chaos and death reign (like at sea). If you read my posts on Crate Trained Believers and The Devouring Lion, you may have noticed the similar imagery. Gentle AND Fierce.

Interestingly, the Hebrew word for mother, em (aleph, mem), also has the pictographic meaning of strong waters.[8] It seems as though the very fact that women have a womb that can fill with life giving waters connects them to Miriam.[9] Females made in the image of Elohim are “mothers” of all living. However, like our sisters Chavah (Eve) and Miriam, we also have the potential to bring chaos and death. (Like a tumultuous ocean.) One must learn to turn life’s bitter unruly waters into sweet waters of refreshing. By the way, this is also something men need to learn as well, for both men and women are revealed in the woman as the wife and bride of the Lamb.

This is the real Biblical portrayal of Miriam, the sister of Moses. She is truly a mother to the Israelites and a leader of her people.[10] Since the force and strength of her name is better understood, does this lend fresh insight about Mary (Miriam), mother of Yeshua? Isn’t it fitting that Yeshua should come forth from a womb such as this? How about the many other “Mary’s” mentioned in the Brit Chadashah (N.T.)? Will their stories speak a little louder the next time you read them?

There has been a tendency for us to forget that the Body needs both masculine and feminine leadership to keep us in balance and to display the whole image of Elohim (God). It is females that bring qualities such as comfort, nurture, protection, and mothering to the Body of Messiah. They are fierce AND gentle. Without these essentials, we raise nothing more than Devouring Lions.

Miriam is a representation of strength, the womb, mercy, prophecy, and praise. The ancient sages recognized the vital role of women in the Exodus in the Babylonian Talmud, Sotah 9b:

“If it wasn’t for the righteousness of women of that generation we would not have been redeemed from Egypt”

The rabbis recognized the very thing examined above: women were the progenitors of Israel’s redemption from Egypt.[11] I hope that you will include Miriam’s Cup in your Seder or even in your weekly Kiddush as a commemoration of her vital role in the Exodus and as a role model to your daughters, sisters, mothers, and wives. But, if this isn’t enough to convince you, there is so much more! In Part II, we will look at how water is associated with the rock in the wilderness, the Holy Spirit, Wisdom, and Pesach.

 


[2] There is Yocheved, the brave midwives (Puah & Shifrah), Miriam, and Tzipporah. See also footnote 6.

[3] Ex. 15:20

[4] Obviously, the Holy Spirit is what provoked Miriam to do this!

[5] Num. 20:1-2  Then the sons of Israel, the whole congregation, came to the wilderness of Zin in the first month; and the people stayed at Kadesh. Now Miriam died there and was buried there.  (2)  There was no water for the congregation, and they assembled themselves against Moses and Aaron.

[6] D. Hollisa Alewine’s Workbook 5 The Torah Portions Volume 2 –Shemot p.7-21 (2013) offers an interesting perspective on the women of the Exodus and Miriam in particular. If you’re ready to dig deep, buy this series and uncover a multitude of treasures.

[7] Numbers Chapter 12.

[8] See Hebrew Word Pictures by Frank T. Seekins (2003) p. 62

[9] The Hebrew word for womb, racham, ends with the letter mem. This is the same Hebrew word for mercy or compassion. Indeed the watery womb is a place of protection, growth, maturity, and nurture. This word shares the resh and mem with Miriam only adding a chet, which is a fence or boundary that protects.

[10] Micah 6:4  “Indeed, I brought you up from the land of Egypt And ransomed you from the house of slavery, And I sent before you Moses, Aaron and Miriam.

[11] This makes perfect sense considering the “birthing” nature of women.

 

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