Posts Tagged With: role of women

In the Beginning: LIGHT

It’s a new year with a renewed Torah cycle. The human soul craves new beginnings, do-overs, fresh starts, and restoration. The Creator knows this well and has built many such renewals into His calendar. We have a renewal every day, week (Shabbat), and month (new moon). Renewals occur at various points throughout each year (moedim), and especially at the new year, in the seven year cycle (Shemittah), and in the fifty year rotation (Jubilee/Yovel).

At the turn of the year (7thmonth), the weekly Torah Portion cycle begins anew with Genesis. This year (5780), is the fifth year of the current Shemittah cycle.[1] As I’ve consulted with others, prayed, and meditated on this upcoming cycle, many things have been on my lev (heart/mind). The creation days in this week’s portion, B’reishit, are the foundation of all things. They especially inform the many other sets of sevens found throughout the Bible.[2]

The year that just went out was a year four, which mirrored day four of creation, the day that natural light from the sun, moon, and stars was separated from the darkness. Their mandate was to rule the day and night, and to be heavenly governors and calendar markers for those that dwell upon the earth. Spiritually speaking, they represent God’s authority of not only creation and man, but of time. What or who governs your clock, calendar, and time? Did you receive “light” on these issues in the previous year?

The Light of the World is Messiah:

John 8:12 (TLV) Yeshua spoke to them again, saying, “I am the light of the world. The one who follows Me will no longer walk in darkness, but will have the light of life.”

The Torah (Law) is Light:

Ps. 119:105 (TLV) Your word is a lamp to my feet and a light to my path.

Pr. 6:23 (TLV) For the mitzvah is a lamp, Torah a light, and corrective discipline the way of life.

Followers of Messiah and His Torah are also Light:

Mat. 5:14-16 (TLV) You are the light of the world. A city set on a hill cannot be hidden. 15 Neither do people light a lamp and put it under a basket. Instead, they put it on a lampstand so it gives light to all in the house. 16 In the same way, let your light shine before men so they may see your good works and glorify your Father in heaven.”

Has the authority that Adonai has given you to be one of His “lights” to the world been challenged? I have certainly witnessed those dead set on hiding the “light” of others in year four with the promise to continue to do so in the fifth year. Light and authority go hand in hand as the proclamation of day four of creation. Challenging authority is challenging Light. Oppressing a brother or sister by denying their authority to be a light to the world is akin to hiding their light.

This has always been the mind and intent of the enemy. His heart is set on enslavement, bondage, and taking captives. His desire to rule, reign, and govern is a false light that is really darkness. He proclaims to be light. He masquerades as light. He proclaims himself holy, righteous, and good. But, he rules by fear and scare tactics. He wants you to be afraid, to question what God has said, and to be fearful to walk in your calling. His focus is to subject, dominate, silence, and make himself the head. (Isaiah 14 – King of Babylon) It seems that we should recognize him easily, but we don’t. Messiah warns that false light is difficult to discern. In fact, it is possible that the light we think we have is really darkness.

Luke 11:33-36 (NASB) “No one, after lighting a lamp, puts it away in a cellar nor under a basket, but on the lampstand, so that those who enter may see the light. 34 The eye is the lamp of your body; when your eye is clear, your whole body also is full of light; but when it is bad, your body also is full of darkness. 35 Then watch out that the light in you is not darkness. 36 If therefore your whole body is full of light, with no dark part in it, it will be wholly illumined, as when the lamp illumines you with its rays.”

The Spirit of Messiah stands in stark contrast to those that seek to oppress and hide the true light. He says:

Luke 4:18-19 (TLV) “The Ruach Adonai is on me, because He has anointed me to proclaim Good News to the poor. He has sent me to proclaim release to the captives and recovery of sight to the blind, to set free the oppressed, 19 and to proclaim the year of Adonai’s favor.”

The body has two eyes, not one. THEY are the lamp of the body. This is akin to the Torah and the Messiah. It is also like a man and a woman as one flesh, the male and female created on day 6. Each is an “eye” in their unity. The man and woman (as echad) should be filled with the Light of Torah and Messiah. This is also the message of day and year four. The Light of the Torah and the Spirit were given on the fourth feast day: Shavuot or Pentecost.

Two eyes and two equal yet different perspectives, like the two tablets and two loaves waved before Adonai on Shavuot. These prepare one to walk properly in the Spirit of Power of day and year five to move rapidly throughout the earth like the birds and fish to spread the Seed (Gospel). If they fulfill their mandate and move within their (wind) currents of purpose, they will be judged favorably in year (day) six.

What are these two eyes on the ONE body (man and wife)? They are the Torah of Chesed (lovingkindness) and the Torah of Emet (Truth). The woman teaches the Torah of Chesed and the man the Torah of Truth. Both are equally important. Hiding or covering one eye partially blinds the body and the family unit. The lamp becomes dim and darkness encroaches. When light is suppressed, the people are oppressed. Praise Adonai that Messiah recovers sight to the blind – both eyes are able to function properly. (Is. 61, Luke 4:18)

Rabbi Sacks has an excellent video explaining the role of men and women as the Torah of Kindness and Truth.[3] I pray it enlightens your Torah cycle this year!

Ps. 118:24-29 (TLV) This is the day that Adonai has made! Let us rejoice and be glad in it! 25 Hoshia-na! Please, Adonai, save now! We beseech You, Adonai, prosper us! 26 Baruch haba b’Shem Adonai—Blessed is He who comes in the Name of Adonai. We bless you from the House of Adonai. 27 Adonai is God, and He has given us light. Join the festival with branches, up to the horns of the altar. 28 You are my God, and I praise You. You are my God—I exalt You! 29 Praise Adonai, for He is good, for His lovingkindness endures forever.


[1]Leviticus 25

[2]For an in-depth thematic study of this, see The Creation Gospel: The Foundation Workbook One by Dr. Hollisa Alewine. And, Know the Time, Change Your World by Barry Miller.

[3]Thank you, Barry Miller, for bringing this video to my attention!

Categories: Torah Portions, Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Renewed Podcasts

Tonight is the 40th day of the Omer! I hope you’ve been counting the days to Shavuot. It’s been a while since I’ve posted on Grace in Torah, but I haven’t forgotten any of you, dear readers. I have a few upcoming articles about Proper Speech (The Tongue), Counting the Omer, and Shavuot. If you’d like a taste, you can listen (for free) to some recent podcasts with me and Dr. Deb Wiley on Hebrew Nation Radio.

You do need to be a Hebrew Nation subscriber to hear episodes that have been placed in the archives. But, it’s free to join! Why wait? You can also like Renewed Radio’s Facebook page (renewedhnr) to receive the latest podcasts in your newsfeed. Meanwhile, I’m praying you each have a very blessed Shavuot. May Adonai’s Light and Fire Shine on you and be gracious to you.

Fire on the Mountain – Shavuot

Silence & Proper Speech

Counting the Omer & Women in the Body of Messiah

Women in the Body of Messiah Part 2

And last but not least, John Diffenderfer joined us to discuss a fascinating topic:

Intimacy Symbolized in the Feasts and the Tabernacle

By the way, Dr. Deb and I are always looking for those willing to share their testimony on Renewed. If you are such a brave soul, please contact me here in the comments, or at renewedhnr@gmail.com

Categories: Biblical Symbols, Moedim, News Flash | Tags: , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

The Biblical Role of Women Part XI

Role of Women Main Page

dreamstime_l_47405125 copyMan, Woman, and Fire

 

Up until now, we have only explored the roles of the male (zakar) and the female (neqevah).[1] In this post, we will look at what it means to be a man or husband (ish) and a woman or wife (ishshah).

For this reason a man (ish) shall leave his father and his mother, and be joined to his wife (ishshah); and they shall become one flesh. (Gen. 2:24)

Let’s begin by looking at the ish and ishshah in Hebrew.[2] Below are Brown, Driver, and Brigg’s Hebrew definitions.

אישׁ

BDB Definition: (ish) 1) man 1a) man, male (in contrast to woman, female) 1b) husband 1c) human being, person (in contrast to God) 1d) servant 1e) mankind 1f) champion 1g) great man 2) whosoever 3) each (adjective)

 

אשּׁה

BDB Definition: (ishshah) 1) woman, wife, female 1a) woman (opposite of man) 1b) wife (woman married to a man) 1c) female (of animals) 1d) each, every (pronoun)

Man אישׁ and woman אשּׁה share two Hebrew letters: aleph and shin. The difference between the two is that man has the letter yohd and woman has the letter hey. Interestingly, if we put these two together, it spells Yah (yohd, hey). Yah is the poetic form of God’s Name.[3] In other words, the man and the woman each have a piece of the name and authority of God, but only when they come together as one flesh, can we see the Creator’s Name.

יהּ = Yah

This shouldn’t be surprising considering that it takes both the male and the female to display the image of Elohim (God) in the earth. But before we take this further, let’s see what the ish and ishshah share in common. What does aleph and shin spell in Hebrew?

 

אשׁ = Fire

 Man and woman are beings of fire without the yohd and hey (Yah/God).[4] What does this mean? I believe this depicts two different yet complimentary things to us. I want to explore both. The most obvious side of this issue and the one most often taught is the negative aspect. Fire, burning, and consuming are rarely seen as something positive. In the case of men and women or husband and wife, we understand this all too well. If we say that our marriage is burning, we most likely mean that it is falling apart, collapsing from within, or turning into ashes. Thus, let’s consider this for a moment.

Fire is Destructive

Fire burns. Fire is hot. Fire consumes. Fire can destroy life. If you touch a flame, the effects are painful long after you remove your hand. Nothing hurts quite like a burn. And nothing scars our flesh in a worse way. Flesh can literally melt in a fiery furnace. And yet, at the core of our being, you and I (man or woman) ARE fire (aish). Does that sound scary? You see, we can easily (or maybe not so easily) relate to YHWH as being a “consuming fire”, but how often have you thought of yourself as one?

lion fireThe truth is that with or without YHWH, we are still FIRE. We are truly made in the image of our “fiery” Creator. Do you recall from Part IX how we are either a builder or a destroyer? The analogy is the same here. The question is: “What will you do with your fire?”

If we are fueled by the motives and desires of the flesh, we will burn and consume ourselves and our relationships with a destructive heat. Even if we manage to put the flames out, irrevocable damage and scarring is left in our wake. We must be very careful and intentional with the power the Creator has granted unto us.

Men and women are “hot”, and not in a sexy way. The fact that our FLESH naturally produces heat has a spiritual message to teach. If we live by the “flame” of our desires, we are sure to find ourselves in the Refiner’s fire of correction.[5] (How’s that for a living parable?)

 

Fire Cleanses and Refines

On the other hand, fire can cleanse and refine. Fire can give warmth. Fire can tenderize and cook meat. Fire can form, shape, and create new land. Fire and can refine precious metals. Fire can transform dead soil into a rich fertile environment. Fire can preserve life.

Fire, when handled properly and surrounded by definite boundaries, is a very good thing. Thus, we use phrases such as “I’m on fire” to describe our zeal, compassion, blessed efforts, and the like. We even use it to express a winning streak in life or in a game. Not all fire is destructive.

In fact, there are certain seeds that will not germinate and sprout to life without the intense heat from fire. The giant redwoods (sequoias) are a fine example of this. This is interesting considering that most seeds will sprout in the presence of just water. If we look at this natural picture from a spiritual standpoint, the seeds (Word of God) sprout or produce life in the presence of both water and fire. (Does this remind you of baptism in water and fire? The pillar of cloud and pillar of fire? The judgment of water (flood) and of fire? The river of life and the lake of fire?)

At first glance, water and fire seem like polar opposites. But if Hebraic thought has taught me anything it is that every word has the potential to be a contranym and that two diametrically opposed concepts often have a mighty truth to teach if we will just wrestle with the opposites.

The contrast of water and fire was first given to us in Genesis chapter one. The first reference to the Holy Spirit is on Day one of creation where He is hovering or moving upon the faces of WATER. (Gen 1:2). Then, God says, “let there be light”. Light can easily be associated with fire. We see a repeat of this contrast of water and fire on day two when the heavenly waters (shamayim) are separated from the earthly waters (mayim). (Gen. 1:6-8)

shinThe shamayim (heavens) are quite literally waters (mayim) with a shin prefix. As we mentioned above, shin is not only one of the two letters that make the Hebrew word for fire, but it also physically looks like tongues of fire! Thus, it is quite easy to deduce (as Rashi did) that the heavens are indeed waters of fire or fire waters.[6] For our purposes here, the main point is that from the very beginning until the very end, God uses the imagery of both water and fire to not only express His nature, presence, Word, creativity, judgment, and harvest, but also to express similar things in us! The fact that the Hebrew words ish and ishshah depict the heart of men and women as fire and the scientific fact that our “hot” bodies of flesh are composed of mostly water only reiterates this apparent dichotomy.

cropped-art-fire-and-ice-wallpapers-hd-1080p-high-quality-widescreen-hd-wallpaperAre you fire or are you water? The answer is yes. And both water and fire can either destroy life or preserve it. When our lifeblood begins to boil, will it be in lust? In anger? With envy? Or will we give our warmth over to preserve life? To clothe or feed the naked? To defend the helpless?

The truth is that our fire can only be fueled from two places. We either fan the flames with that which is below the expanse or that which is above the expanse. Will our fire come from our lower earthly nature or from the cool, blue, fiery heavens? Both burn with intense heat, both can destroy or purify, but only one does so with a soothing heat that promises everlasting life.

‘Your kingdom come. Your will be done, on earth as it is in heaven. (Mat 6:10)

Back into the Frying Pan

Man

I think you get the analogy now. But I want to zoom back in on the differences between the ish and ishshah one more time. Remember that the word for man or husband contains fire (aish) and the letter yohd. The yohd is a pictograph of a hand (yahd) or a fist. It has the numerical value of ten and carries the idea of working or creating.[7]

fire hand 2This is similar to the function of the zakar (male), but with more emphasis. A man or a husband is for all intents and purposes “a hand on fire”. The fire within a man needs to be channeled into working or creating. (Perhaps this is why so many men love to collect tools. Or why they and boys love mission oriented video games.) A man with idle hands will always find trouble and destruction.[8] Thus, a man’s (and a husband’s) greatest strength is found in what he does with his hands. It is his actions that show YHWH to his wife, to his children, and the world at a large. (And actions really do speak louder than words!)

Do you recall from Part I how the zakar literally serves YHWH when he works the ground? A man’s career will bring him the most fulfillment when he labors to till, guard, and keep what YHWH has given him to tend. In marriage, one way that a man serves his wife and children is by reaping the produce of his labor. Ideally, the provision he provides sustains the family. In this way, his “contained” fire preserves life.

The “hand on fire” or the man has great potential. Those fiery fists can accomplish mighty things. If they are fueled by the cool heavenly flames, his hands will become callused and strong by putting food on the table, building the house, leading and blessing his family, and sometimes even wielding a rod that gently corrects the children. All feel safe, secure, and loved by the large worn hands that create and protect a home that is warmed by his fire.

But as you’ve already surmised, this great strength is also a man’s or husband’s biggest test. Hands that strike and abuse, hands that withdraw when they should caress, hands that fail to work, hands that deal under the table, hands that touch what is forbidden… all these things are a misuse of a man’s fire, but are no less powerful. No one is safe, secure, or loved by a man that gives his fire to these destructions. It won’t take long before his house turns to ashes and all of his labors are consumed.

The good news is that we always have a choice to change fuel sources. A man that finds himself wearing sack cloth and sitting in ashes can rebuild. And if he stays the course, those very ashes will make the ground doubly fruitful. There is always hope. YHWH desires reconciliation. And He loves even the fallen.

Woman

 In the case of the ishshah, a woman or wife is fire with the addition of the letter hey. Hey has a numerical value of five and means a breath or to behold.[9] Pictographically, the letter hey portrays a person with arms lifted up or of an open window. Both imply making something known by drawing attention to it. In other words, the fire of a woman is meant to REVEAL something. I hope you recall from Part X that while women are the epitome of what is hidden, they do in fact reveal (prophetic).

They also draw attention to what isn’t easily seen. For example, YHWH is a Spirit. Though we can’t physically “see” Him, it is usually a woman (mother, grandmother, wife, sister, or the like) that first reveals our hidden God to others. (See Part IX for more on this.) As a wife, a woman can often intuit certain motives of people or circumstances that affect her husband and children. Again, this is her revealing something that is hidden. To make these things known, she must use her hey or breath.

fiery breathThus, for all intents and purposes, a woman is a “fiery breath”. Yikes! That sounds too much like a dragon for my liking! Yet, the fact remains that a woman who is not walking uprightly can sure depict this flaming beast. Just ask any man with a nagging, controlling, or contentious wife.

Ideally, a woman’s gentle breath will be a flame of fervent prayers, praises, and edification. In fact, the hey pictures this very thing. In ancient Hebrew, hey looked more like a person standing with arms lifted high. This is a worship pose. It is certainly one of praise! Perhaps this is why so many women are such valiant worshippers, dancers, counselors, and prayer warriors.

In marriage, this strength carries over to her husband as well. How many of you have read in multiple self help books on marriage that one of man’s greatest desires from his wife is praise? Well, the Hebrew is one more witness to this truth. A man is motivated to work even harder and to stoke the flames brighter when he has a woman that gushes his praises.

Like it or not, we were created to function this way as one flesh. When a man functions in his righteous role as that loving hand of fiery work,[10] the woman feels “safe and secure”, which compels her mouth to sing fiery praises to her man.[11] The converse is also true. Actually, the jury is out on which comes first here… the chicken or the egg. What I do know is that the roles are reciprocal and one fans the flames of the other. If we do our part, even when it seems futile or even if it’s the last thing we “feel” like doing and we don’t grow weary, the other half naturally changes. Change always starts with YOU, not your spouse. But I digress… let’s continue with the woman.

The strength of a wife or woman is in how she expresses the praises of both Adonai and her man. With words women reveal the will and Word of God to their husband and children. Words can encourage, inspire greatness, and motivate others. Words can bind up wounds and brokenness. Words can uncover the heart of a matter or situation. Women are far more relational than men. Our lives focus and center around our family and friends and to maintain these relationships we use our words in person, on the phone, and through social media. There’s a reason women are known for “talking”.

refiners-fireBut like our counterpart, the ish, it is also our greatest test. I once heard someone say that our greatest trials and tests are in our strengths, not our weaknesses. The Refiner’s fire isn’t fun, but it is better to suffer for the sake of righteousness than for the sake of unrighteousness.

Beloved, do not be surprised at the fiery trial when it comes upon you to test you, as though something strange were happening to you. But rejoice insofar as you share Christ’s sufferings, that you may also rejoice and be glad when his glory is revealed. (1 Pet. 4:12-13 ESV)

I wonder how many of these “fiery trials” occurs within marriages? I suspect a great deal. And ladies, how often is our strength (our mouth) the reason for our troubles? Dr. Alewine says that women have trouble with “delivery”. She intends the pun because it encompasses childbirth and delivering a message. How we say things, the way it comes off of our lips, MATTERS.

Women can be gossipy, cheeky, and manipulative with words. Women know how to say all the right things, but say it in a way that undermines the very message they are conveying. With a look, sigh (breath), or even a smile, they can tell you everything you need to know about what they are really thinking. That old adage “sticks and stones may break my bones, but words will never hurt me” is a lie from the pit of hell. Words give or destroy life! And words are indeed associated with fire in the Bible.[12]

When a woman speaks solely from her emotions or feelings her fire can race out of control. The flood from her lips can consume an entire forest. (People are trees!) And because women are gifted with juggling multiple tasks and holding numerous issues, topics, and stressors in the forefront of their mind at one time, this flood can touch EVERY area of the person she spews on at once. Somebody yell, “FIRE!”

We need some water on aisle 9! The good news is that all this destruction can be redeemed. Perhaps, a giant sequoia will grow from the ashes. But of course, the better path is to allow the seeds to sprout after a gentle rain. My prayer is that we LEARN the difference and choose to be a breath of shalom. (By the way, the breath can be another symbol for the Holy Spirit, the ideal role model for the female. See Part V for more detail.)

One Flesh

Now, none of this is meant to limit an ish or ishshah to a one-size-fits-all box. Obviously, men use words and women use their hands! But what this does teach us is that men have more proclivities toward work that involves their hands, physical labor, or just “rolling up their sleeves” to conquer a task (literally and figuratively); whereas, women usually shine brighter when they are able to interact with others in a relational way. There will always be some cross over between the roles of men and women. My thoughts are expressing the general rule based on what I see in real life, the Hebrew language, and the Bible.

Remember, you are not just a light, but also a fire. Burn responsibly.

For previous posts in this series click here

See also Dr. Hollisa Alewine’s The Creation Gospel Workbook 3: The Spirit-Filled Family, p. 39



[1] See Part I.

[2] These transliterations are pronounced eesh and eesh-shah. There is NO short English “i” sound in Hebrew. Every time you see an “i” in a Hebrew transliteration, it is marking the long double “e” (ee) sound. For example, Elohim (God) does not sound like the English word “him” at the end. It sounds like “heem”. If you hear someone making a short “i” sound in a Hebrew word, it is incorrect. 🙂 As my Hebrew teacher taught me, Hebrew uses strong pure vowels. I guess she was implying that English is impure, lol.

[3] For example, see Psalm 77:11. ( Strong’s H3050) Many translations simply translate the poetic name Yah with LORD as they do for the Most Holy Name YHWH. You can search online Bibles to see the poetic version for yourself.

[4] Fire is often transliterated as aish, esh, or aysh. Make the English letter “a” say it’s name then add “sh” to the end and you’re saying it correctly.

[5] But who can endure the day of his coming, and who can stand when he appears? For he is like a refiner’s fire and like fullers’ soap. He will sit as a refiner and purifier of silver, and he will purify the sons of Levi and refine them like gold and silver, and they will bring offerings in righteousness to the LORD. Then the offering of Judah and Jerusalem will be pleasing to the LORD as in the days of old and as in former years. (Mal. 3:2-4 ESV)

[6] The great Jewish commentator Rashi asserts that in Genesis 1:8, “God mingled fire with water and of them made the heavens“. He bases this on an etymological analysis of the Hebrew word for heavens. Rashi explains that shamayim is a compound of the words for fire (esh) and water (mayim).

I wrote about the spiritual aspect of water (and somewhat on fire) in Miriam’s Cup Part I, Part II, and Part III.

You can also read more about the creation days, including the mayim and shamayim, by studying Dr. Hollisa Alewine’s The Creation Gospel Workbook One.

[7] For more on the value of ten, see Hebrew Numbers 1-10.

[8] Pro. 19:15

[9] For more on the number five, see Hebrew Numbers 1-10.

[10] This implies much more than a “job”. I mean work in the fullest sense of the word. Work at work. Work at home. Work for YHWH. Work in marriage. No man does this without LOVE, which we will explore in Part XII.

[11] This is respect or reverence, which we will cover in Part XII.

[12] Think of YHWH’s Ten Words coming from a “smoking” Mt. Sinai and the tongues (words/language) of fire that rested upon the disciples in Acts 2. If good and righteous words are akin to fire, you better believe that there is a counterfeit! What do you think the watery river that flows from the mouth of the dragon in Revelation 12:15-16 is metaphorically speaking about? Remember, water and fire mirror one another. (You can see this comparison in my post on The Rivers of Eden.)

Categories: Women | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , | 10 Comments

The Biblical Role of Women Part X

Role of Women Main Page

In Part VIII and Part IX, we discovered that women (and men as the bride of Messiah) either build the House of Adonai or they tear it down. We also looked at how YHWH sovereignly chose to first entrust the Torah and the Gospel with His daughters. Again, this is about building His House. It is the mother who first teaches a child the Torah. Then later, as the child matures, the Father brings the stronger correction (mussar).

Hear, my son, your father’s instruction (mussar) And do not forsake your mother’s teaching (torah). (Pro. 1:8)

My son, observe the commandment (mitzvah) of your father And do not forsake the teaching (torah) of your mother. (Pro. 6:20)

In both of the proverbs mentioned above, the father is mentioned first, but it is the Torah of the mother that is not to be forsaken. To forsake is to abandon or forget – implying something that was learned beforehand. Infants begin life by receiving the nourishing milk of the mother in both the physical and in the spiritual through her teaching. In light of this simplicity, it is easy to understand why the women were the first to receive and proclaim the Torah and the Gospel. The tender mercies of a mother’s teaching are balanced by the stricter judgment/correction of the Father. Both are necessary to bring a child to maturity. (This is true physically and spiritually.)

The Hidden Woman and Time

I hope that you have noticed a common theme emerging throughout my posts on women. The woman is often “hidden” within the biblical narratives, much like she was once “hidden” within Adam. There is good reason for this when we take the whole of Scripture into account. Righteous women are a living representation of the Holy Spirit; and as such, they also portray the prophetic or what is future.

If that sounds too far fetched for your liking, let us first consider the Hebraic concept of time. Westerners typically view the past as being what is “behind” us, whereas the future is what is in “front” or ahead of us. Thus, to encourage someone to stop dwelling on past mistakes, we might tell them to “stop looking back” (past) or to “focus on what is ahead” (future). But in Hebraic thought, these expressions are reversed. The past is what you can see; it’s in front of you (and your eyes). The future (what you can’t see) is behind you. Perhaps the following illustration will flesh out this notion.

ff_130330_6339-Edit

In this image, the man is the power (motor/rower) and the one steering. But as such, he faces away from where he is headed. The woman in the boat is the one that can clearly see upcoming obstacles in their path. Can you see the roles of men and women in this analogy?

Imagine someone rowing a boat down a river. The river is time. In order to row a boat, a person must face backwards while rowing forward down the river. What the rower can see with his eyes is the area he has already travelled. (past) Because he doesn’t face in the direction he is headed, he cannot see what is ahead (future). This is truly how mankind experiences time. What has already happened (past) is clearly seen and understood, but the future is unclear and unknown. I know this totally reverses the definitions of hindsight and foresight, but I’ve found that most things in western thought compared with Hebraic thought are (sadly) reversed! Things like this shouldn’t surprise us any more.

Do you recall the function or role of the male from Part I? He is to remember (zakar). In order to remember or recall something, the thing being referred to would have already happened. In other words, it requires looking at what’s in front of you on the river of time. (Past) Everything that YHWH has said, the male is to remember and act on that Word. (This doesn’t excuse women from doing the same! The two become ONE flesh.) The man guards and protects all those things that are clearly “written.” Moreover, what is “past” is evident; there is no ambiguity. In other words, the past is firm or set in stone. Just like the written Word of God, it does not change. Can you see how this makes the male a picture of not only a firm foundation on which to build, but also associates him with time past? (Both are firm, set, solid, and reliable.)

As the male’s counter balance, the female should then represent the other side of this coin or what is “future.” Does Scripture indicate that this might be true? I believe that it does. Before we look at the Biblical text, let’s first consider the things that women do. They birth, nurture, and build the House or the future of God’s people. The stories involving women in the Bible are more hidden (or obscure) in the text. When we do encounter women in the Biblical record, prophetic (future) things are often being revealed.

Moreover, In Part I, we looked at the neqevah or female as a protector and setter of of boundaries. But when we examine the context of this word in its further uses, something awesome is revealed. Often neqevah is juxtaposed with sound alike Hebrew words that deal with future expectation. For example, qevah without the nun prefix means to wait, expect, or hope. All of these words imply looking toward something that is future. [1] But even more interesting, if we add the nun back to qevah as a prefix, it indicates the collective future tense! Reread Jeremiah 31:22 with this in mind and the prophetic picture is heightened to include an expectation for a good future. 

Sometimes, at first glance, the motives of women are uncertain. Women usually have a strong sense of “knowing” or great intuition into things that are hidden or concealed from plain sight. They can often pick up on things in the spiritual realm easier than men. This is why most of the great women referenced in the Bible are called “prophetesses.” [2] They represent the future and the prophetic. I could go on, but you get the point. It takes both a male and female to display the image of Elohim in the earth. And life cannot be understood separately from time.

Future-Present-Past-1680x1050The Most Holy Name of our Elohim, YHWH (yohd, hey, vav, hey), is the very essence of time. As a form of the verb “to be,” the I Am, He is the One who is, who was, and who is to come. In other words, He is our present, our past, and our future. YHWH is time itself. Thus, it is no coincidence that mankind (male and female) as His image in the earth also typify time.

Men portray the past. Women picture the future. Together, as male and female, they build in the present with YHWH. Both men and women are equally important in displaying the image of God and His time clock. YHWH’s calendar masterfully weaves together both the past (remember) and the future (what is to come) in His holy moedim (feasts). Women are intrinsically connected to the rhythms and cycles of the Creator’s calendar. You can read more about this in my series entitled Moonbeams and the Moedim.

YHWH has plainly told us that His desire is to REVEAL Himself unto His people. Men, in the image of God, represent what YHWH has already revealed of Himself (past). Women represent how YHWH works behind the scenes of our lives and the many promises and plans He has for us (future). If we could just grasp the enormity of what will happen when the woman is revealed, then we’d all be screaming from the rooftops, “The Spirit and the Bride say, ‘Come!’”

Key #1 Men portray the past. Women picture the future. Together, 
as male and female, they build in the present with YHWH.

 

The Revealed Man and Time

For the most part, men (and their role) have stood out in the Biblical text, in history, and within marriages and families. This is to be expected since men are a picture of the past and what is REVEALED. We don’t have to “look” for the masculine. The role of the man stands out, just as they do physically. Nothing is hidden.

Conversely, women represent what is HIDDEN. If the role of women were easy to “see” or discern, there would be no need for this series. In the natural, this truth is likewise expressed to us in our most intimate parts that create life. I know this is rather crude, but consider that a woman’s reproductive organs are “hidden,” whereas a man’s reproductive organs stand out. Men are clearly revealed; women are concealed. Do you think this is just happenstance? Can this natural picture also be speaking a spiritual truth?

If so, why would we ever consider that one supersedes the other? It takes both male and female “parts” to create life in the natural. Do you suppose it is any different in the spiritual realm? I submit to you that it is not. The ideal function of both man and woman is to express the image of God in the earth. While their “parts” or roles are different, it takes both working together to create New Life. If one side of this coin is shunned, regulated, oppressed, usurped, or gagged Abundant Life cannot grow.

“The thief comes only to steal and kill and destroy; I came that they may have life, and have it abundantly.” John 10:10

Why Does This Matter?

Abundant life includes happy and healthy marriages. It also includes the entire Body of Messiah (men and women) being able to function within the full capacity of their roles in our assemblies. My hope in the remaining articles of this series is to emphasize the fact that YHWH’s ideal for men and women is to work together. Each is one half of the whole.

The problem is with our fallen natures or our evil inclinations. The old man operates from a place of fear rather than love. This is why we struggle greatly not only with the role of the sexes, but in every other area of life as well. But, our Redeemer beckons us to walk in New Life. May our marriages truly become the living parable of Messiah and His Assembly.

 

For past articles in this series, click here. For Part XI click here.

Key #1 Men portray the past. Women picture the future. Together,
as male and female, they build in the present with YHWH.

 

 [1] See The Scarlet Harlot and the Crimson Thread Workbook Four, page 140 (2012) by Dr. Hollisa Alewine. Also see Strong’s number H6960 (qevah or kavah). 

[2]  Examples include Miriam, Deborah, Huldah, and Anna.

See also Dr. Hollisa Alewine’s The Creation Gospel Workbook 3: The Spirit-Filled Family, p. 40

 

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