Let There Be Truth – New Moon Interview

Recently, I joined Caleb Gee of Let There Be Truth podcast in a discussion about celebrating the Biblical New Moon. Caleb is a gracious host with a desire to restore the things the church has lost throughout the centuries. If you are new to the Feasts of Adonai, this episode will give you a good summary about what the new moons represent and how you can be intentional about celebrating them, all to the glory of God.

 

Ways to Listen:

 

Apple Podcasts

BuzzSprout

iHeart Podcasts

PodVerse

 

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The Missing Manna Moment

The following is copied with permission from the 7 & 50 Rhymes blog, by Barry Miller. If you are interested in the larger cycles of Adonai, the shemittah (7 year release) and the Yovel (Jubilee – 50 years) in light of history and current events, I highly recommend Barry Miller’s book Know the Time, Change Your World, and his aforementioned blog. Last week, Barry pointed out an interesting connection between the manna (that didn’t fall on the seventh day/Shabbat), and the seventh year of the shemittah cycle. He demonstrates this pattern in recent history, and how it can teach us what to expect in the near future.

I hope this gives you much to ponder during this year’s Omer Count. It has sure caused me to meditate upon these patterns in a new way. (: Here is an excerpt from Barry’s post; you can read the full article in the link below.

 

I am purposefully writing this now because over the next few years I expect the information below to have a significant impact. For thirty years I have worked to teach and explain the 7-year cycle. I have repeatedly pointed to Deuteronomy 15:1,

“At the end of every seven years you must cancel debts.” 

As I have often suggested, simply observing the instructions of Deuteronomy 15:1 will yield untold benefits. However, at this juncture I must add a further consideration in order to guide us through the next cycle.

Specifically, the distinct significance of the 7th or final seven-year sequence within the 50-year Jubilee cycle.

In this article, I will be exploring the eras of fifty years ago, one hundred years ago, and one hundred fifty years ago in order to demonstrate a rhyme I’ve observed. It is also important to notice that our actions and the actions of groups in society may create positive and negative influences. Moreover, I’ve noted the patterns of rhymes are often visible as exact opposites. (See the example of 1940s vs. 1990s in the footnotes.*)

Please recognize that moments of disaster in the past can become moments of great accomplishments at the rhyming moment of the current cycle if we learn from past mistakes and mend our ways with the Creator and our fellowman.

In the fall of 2022, we will indeed reach the end of year 7 in the 6th sequence of seven-year sets since 1980, the moment when having a stable balance sheet should have been our goal as per Deuteronomy 15:1. The fall of 2022 begins the 7th AND FINAL set of seven years of the 50-year Jubilee cycle. I project the 50-year cycle to end in the fall of 2030. In other words, the 7th set of seven years will be present from the fall of 2022 to the fall of 2029, directly followed by the 50th Jubilee year.

What has me concerned now? Why focus on 50 years now? The events of 1973-74 have puzzled me for years in regard to the Shemitah cycle, but when I put those events together with the words from Exodus 16:27, “On the seventh day some of the people went out to gather, but they found none”, suddenly things made more sense.

To better understand the events of the late 1960’s and the early 1970’s, we need to apply the 7- and 50-year pattern; 1972 was the end of the 7th year just like 2022 will be the end of the 7th year. The economic turmoil of the 1973 Yom Kippur War and the following Arab oil embargo caused much havoc in the world’s economy. The Shemitah cycle alone does little to explain 1973-74, but adding in the aspect of the 50-year Jubilee pattern helped

The fall of 1972 was a fine time to stabilize one’s balance sheet, reduce one’s debt etc., but in retrospect it clearly was not a time to sound the “all-clear” for “risk-on” activity. The world’s energy supply would be drastically disrupted just 18 months later. What can we learn?

I suggest we consider Exodus 16:27, “On the seventh day some of the people went out to gather, but they found none.” Here we have an example of people who were used to a certain consistent economic reality. For six days manna had been there every morning when they went out looking for it. Following their own instincts and based on their own experience, a habit had developed, and even though Moses had warned them to gather a double portion on the sixth day and not to expect manna on day seven, this group opted to trust their own experience rather than the pattern Moses was trying to teach them. Therefore, we can assume they did not gather double on day six and went out on day seven expecting manna on the ground where they had always found it previously, but instead, found none.

So, what about 1973?

Click here to read the whole article: The Missing Manna Moment

Categories: Moedim | Tags: , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Messiah in Passover: A family Haggadah

Just in time for Passover: A New Haggadah!

 

For over ten years now, I have edited and revised the haggadah my family uses for Passover. Finally, after all those years of laboring in love for those that sit at our Passover table, I have published our haggadah for the public. I formatted it to be aesthetically pleasing, but also very economical, so it is affordable to buy multiple copies. (They are only $5 a copy!)


Messiah in Passover: A Family Haggadah
, follows the traditional fifteen steps of the Orthodox seder, but it also highlights Messiah’s Passion Week. Our goal was to make it very understandable for curious Christians and children, while still maintaining the flow of the Orthodox seder. While many explanations are given within the seder, I wrote a lengthy introduction to elaborate on the elements and background for the Passover meal. In our home, we give participants a copy of the haggadah to take home, with the hope that they will read the introduction and gain an even better understanding of why keeping Passover is valuable for all those that follow Yeshua (Jesus). The introduction also helps those new to celebrating the LORD’s Passover prepare for the feast physically and spiritually.

 

With a 45 minute festival meal, Messiah in Passover takes a total of two and half hours to complete. With the break for the meal, this hasn’t been too cumbersome, even for smaller children at our table. I hope this labor of love will bless you and your family this Passover!

Buy copies here.

 

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Chametz & Matzah

Matzah = מַצָּה 

Chametz = חָמֵץ 

 

These “breads” contain the same Hebrew letters, save one. Both have a mem and a tzade. But matzah ends with a heh, and chametz begins with a chet. These two letters look so much alike that they are often confused. Heh has a small opening on the upper left, and is expressed as a breathy “h.” Chet has no such window, and is expressed as a hard, guttural “kh.”  The difference between these letters could be said to be a soft or hard expulsion of air. Chametz is hard, and matzah is soft. But like their differing letters, are often confused. 

On the flip side, the difference between the actual breads of matzah and chametz, have the opposite connotations. Chametz is associated more with soft, airy puffed up bread; whereas matzah is associated with dry, dense, hard bread. 

And, so it is to the soul. Chametz (soft) is more desired by the nephesh, while matzah is more loathed (hard). That is the illusion we must break free from at this season. 

The letters and sounds of these Hebrew words teach the nephesh the truth: matzah is truly the more delightful, soft “bread.” In the plural, matzot is spelled the same as mitzvot, the commandments, which also are a delight. “Help me walk in the path of Your mitzvot—for I delight in it.” (Psa 119:35  TLV) Whereas, chametz is the figure of what makes one hard, callus, and puffed up. Sweep the house clean. 

 

In this season, we remove chametz, and its beginnings or root, which is se’or (bread starters), from our homes and hearts. Every crumb must go and be burned before Pesach arrives. It’s searching diligently for and then releasing all the things that attaches us to the seeming luxuries of Mitzrayim (Egypt).

Yet, we struggle with discerning between matzah and chametz. Every year at this season, debates about what is actually chametz abound, confusing, especially, those new to this process. Varying traditions can make this even more difficult.  If this occurs with natural chametz, how much more so does it occur when it comes to spiritual chametz? 

In the past, I’ve thrown out things that I later discovered weren’t actually chametz, and in other times I kept things that I later discovered was chametz. Stop and think about that from a spiritual perspective. Haven’t we done the same when it comes to doctrines and traditions? 

The above doesn’t include the things that I accidentally overlooked. For example, one year, in the middle of the feast of Unleavened Bread, I found a full, unopened package of Oreo cookies on top of my refrigerator. (When you are vertically challenged and live with those that are not, don’t forget to check all the high places!)

All these natural things have taught me a lot about spiritual chametz. I doubt there has been a time when my house was truly free of (physical and spiritual) chametz. That doesn’t prevent me from trying to remove it; instead, it brings me humility as I approach Adonai with my efforts, and grace toward my brothers and sisters. This is what is needed before Passover arrives. The physical process is designed to teach and train one’s heart, and reveal what lurks in its depths. 

The difference between chametz and matzah is subtle. They are very close, yet very different. May the Father of Lights grant us wisdom to know the difference in the natural, and especially, in the spiritual realms this year! 

“He humbled you and let you be hungry, and fed you with manna which you did not know, nor did your fathers know, that He might make you understand that man does not live by bread alone, but man lives by everything that proceeds out of the mouth of the LORD.” (Deuteronomy 8:3, NASB)

Categories: Biblical Symbols, Moedim | Tags: , , , | 10 Comments

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